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The New ABCs of Medical School: Anatomy, Biochemistry, and Cooking

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High-Value Care Increasingly Becoming Core Part of Med School Curriculum

High-value care has been added to curricula for many aspiring physicians

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Consider a ‘Bridge’ Program as an Online Nursing Student

Some programs allow registered nurses to earn a master’s degree in nursing without holding a bachelor’s in the discipline.

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It Takes A Village to Get Through Nursing School

When you think of being successful in college, you know lots of hard work, hours of studying, and a dedicated commitment will pay off. But if you’re heading into nursing school this fall, there’s also another essential, piece of the puzzle that will help your college years go as smoothly as possible.

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Wall Street Journal: Colleges Lock Horns Over Nursing Programs

Four-year institutions try to prevent community colleges from offering advanced programs

When California state Sen. Marty Block was working on a bill to allow community colleges to offer some bachelor’s degrees, a B.S. in nursing seemed like a sure bet.

Most of the four-year California State University campuses that offer a bachelor’s in nursing have to turn students away, at a time when the state’s hospitals increasingly demand that new nurses hold such degrees. But Mr. Block, a Democrat, soon got the message from four-year schools and their lobbyists: Stay off our turf.

So the final bill that passed in 2014 allowed community colleges to offer bachelor’s programs in such subjects as mortuary sciences and ranch management but not nursing.

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posted in: Career, Education, California, news, Employer News, University News
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The 10 best U.S. colleges for a nursing degree

A degree in nursing equips students with the skills to provide quality patient care. Students are given the opportunity to take what they learn in the classroom and apply it to the real world in a clinical setting. These unique opportunities ensure graduates are fully prepared to enter a fast-paced and evolving field. Nursing is also one of the highest paying majors.

All of these colleges offer programs that introduce students to nursing and develop a strong foundation that allows graduates to either enter the workforce or pursue advanced degrees. Graduates of these programs are also qualified to take the National Council Licensing Examination to become a registered nurse.

The list below breaks down the top 10 places to get a nursing degree in the U.S. in the 2015-16 academic year. The list comes from College Factual and is a ranking of colleges based on their overall quality. These schools offer programs that help prepare students for a successful and rewarding career in the medical field.

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Are student nurses disillusioned with nursing?

In this age of (over)sharing on social media, I am fully aware of the negative impact the proposed changes to the NHS are having on the morale of student nurses.

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10 Out Of The Box Job Hunting Tips

Creative strategies

If you are out of work this presents a problem because there is often a large quantity of qualified applicants seeking a given job.

In these times, it is more important than ever to think outside of the box when applying for jobs.

Here are 10 creative job hunting tips:

1) Know what positions are available at a company

Before you can try to work for a company, you need to figure out what job openings the company has.  Once you know this you can focus your energy on trying to get that specific job. You can look on a company website to see what job openings a company has. However, the best strategy would be to speak to someone who works at the company as often times companies don’t update their websites with every potential and available job opening.

2) Use LinkedIn and use it well

LinkedIn is widely recognized as the best social network for career professionals. LinkedIn can be utilized as a great resource to connect with people at a company that you are interested in working for. The key on LinkedIn is to compile as many direct connections to other professionals that you can.  More direct connections will convert into more secondary connections.

So, if you want to work for Facebook, and you have 200 LinkedIn connections, there is a chance that one of your connections has a connection with someone working at Facebook. This secondary connection can then be leveraged by you to get introduced to the respective person that works at Facebook. And, as we all know - knowing someone who works at the company which you are applying to - can greatly increase your odds of securing the job.

3) Take a look at resume samples

Before finalizing your resume, it is wise to take a look at resume samples. By reviewing other resumes, you can get ideas for ways to improve the content and look and feel of your resume. Looking at resume samples often helps you to identify specific areas where you can improve your expertise or enhance the way you present yourself to potential employers.

4) Be creative about how you use Twitter

You can utilize Twitter to look for jobs in several ways, one of the most creative ways is to use Twitter to locate and contact someone at a given company. You can use Twellow to search Twitter profiles.  Search for the company that you want to work for - and you may find someone who has a profile
that says, Director of Biz Dev for company X.

Now that you found that person, you can follow them on Twitter hoping that they follow you back so that you can DM them.Or you can mention them in the hopes they will then get in touch with you. Also, sometimes people include their email address in their profile so you can contact them that way. Either way, Twitter offers a creative way to develop a contact, as the person may appreciate your hard work and creativity in getting in touch with them.

5) Consider different types of jobs

You don’t want to have tunnel vision and only look for one type of job.  Especially with the unemployment rate being what it is - you have to think about a few different types of job titles to consider. When you have a few different areas you are considering - it will open up a wide range of options for yourself and you’ll end up getting more interviews and call-backs.  And remember, each interview is an opportunity to not only get a job but also to develop key contacts within an organization.

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20 Ways to Stay Motivated During Your Job Search

The longer you look for a job, the tougher it becomes. Who could blame you for feeling despondent, discouraged, depressed—even bitter? Some days you may not even feel like getting out of bed.

Unfortunately, not only is depression, well, depressing, it also makes it harder to get out there and look. And the less you get out and look, the less likely a job offer will come your way. Even worse, prospective employers tend to be turned off by negativity. It’s the most dastardly kind of Catch-22.

What all this means is that a major part of anyone’s job hunt is staying motivated. We all have our ways of keeping on keeping on, but here are some time-tested suggestions to prevent your search from getting you down:

1. Join a job-search group. It’s a reason to get out of the house and a venue to vent. You may even get some great feedback on your presentation, resume, cover letter, etc.

2. Socialize with employed friends. It’s a reminder that jobs do exist. Besides, these are the folks most likely to know about available positions and upcoming openings.

3. Limit your exposure to the news. Yes, you do need to know what’s going on in the world, but you don’t need to wallow in the latest dismal job-market reports.

4. Invigorate yourself through hobbies or sports. These can be activities you already love or, better yet, something new and exciting.

5. Avoid “glass-is-half-empty” folks. Everyone knows people like this. Minimize your exposure to them as much as you can.

6. Hang out with people who make you feel good about yourself. Find and stick with friends and family who respect you, who like you for who you are, and who are positive and upbeat.

7. Expand your network every single day. The growth of your professional network is a better way to measure progress than how many interviews you have each week.

8. Expose yourself to media that inspire you. Choose books, blogs, magazines, movies, and TV that uplift you and make you feel the world is a wonderful place.

9. Read biographies of successful people. It can help enormously to realize that every successful person encountered failures and setbacks along the way. Every single one.

10. Try new (to you) job-search techniques. Go for an informational interview or switch your resume from chronological to functional. A different approach may breathe new life into your hunt.

11. Get a mentor. If you have a mentor, get a second one. You’re allowed to have as many as you want or need. Mentors offer perspective, advice, and encouragement.

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Who to Ask for a Reference

When an employer checks references, the first place they are going to check with is your previous employer. However, not all companies provide references for employees. In fact, some companies may only confirm that you worked at the company and confirm your dates of employment.

Who to Ask for a Reference

That’s why it’s important to have a list of professional references, in addition to employment references, that you can provide to employers. Who should you ask to provide references? Supervisors and colleagues (if company policy permits) may be able to provide a reference for you.

Business contacts, customers, clients, vendors, and other individuals you have a professional relationship with can be used as references.

Professional vs. Personal References

In addition to professional references, personal references, also known as character references, can be used for employment purposes.

Neighbors and family friends may be willing to write a reference for you. Teachers, professors, academic advisors, volunteer leaders, coaches, can all provide personal references.

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