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Nurses are in high demand and this is why men should consider becoming one

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Top Undergrad Majors at the Best Medical Schools

Biological science is among the most popular undergrad majors at top-ranked medical schools, U.S. News data show.

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MORE MEN MOVE TO NURSING CAREERS

Brian Medley, a nurse at Lurie Children’s Hospital, and Zain Rehman, a nurse at Advocate Christ Medical Center Intensive Care Unit, talked about their career path.

Nursing has historically been a female-dominated field, but men are increasingly pursuing the career. The percentage of men in nursing is still small, only about 9 percent to 10 percent,

A nursing career holds many advantages for men, such as highly diverse patient care environments, career stability, and a competitive salary.

Resurrection University will host a “Thinking Out Loud” speaker series for men, by men.

“Men in Nursing” is a free event that brings together a panel of male nursing professionals to talk about what it’s like to be a nurse in today’s healthcare environment

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posted in: Alabama, Alaska, Career, Arkansas, Arizona, Education, Colorado, California, Delaware, Diversity, Connecticut, Event, Resume Help, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Scholarships, Indiana, Interviewing, International, Iowa, Kansas, JobAlert, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Georgia, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, National, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, news, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, North Dakota, Illinois, Oklahoma, Oregon, Michigan, Employer News, Texas, Rhode Island, rss, Ohio, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, New York, University News, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, Washington D.C., West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming
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The New ABCs of Medical School: Anatomy, Biochemistry, and Cooking

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High-Value Care Increasingly Becoming Core Part of Med School Curriculum

High-value care has been added to curricula for many aspiring physicians

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New York pushes nurse staffing ratios bill for hospitals, nursing homes

New York legislators are considering the Safe Staffing for Quality Care Act, a nurse staffing ratios bill for hospitals and nursing homes that is supported by the New York State Nurses Association and the New York State Public Employees Federation and opposed by the New York State Organization of Nurse Executives and the Greater New York Hospital Association. 

The bill (A00921 and S4553) would require one-nurse-to-one-patient staffing in the operating room, trauma emergency unit, intensive care and maternal/child care units during the second and third stages of labor. It would set a minimum of one nurse to two patients during the first stage of labor and in postanesthesia units; one nurse to three patients in antepartum, ED, pediatrics, telemetry and newborn and intermediate care nursery units; one nurse to four patients on med/surg units and acute care psychiatric units; one nurse to five patients on rehabilitation units; and one nurse to six patients on well-baby nursery units. The minimum requirements shall be adjusted to reflect the need for additional direct-care nurses in accordance with an approved acuity system.

The proposed ratios are more stringent for some units compared with California’s safe staffing ratios law, which went into effect in 2004 and mandates one nurse to two critical care patients, one nurse to four patients on telemetry units and EDs, and one nurse to five patients on med/surg floors.

California experience

Linda H. Aiken, RN, PhD, FAAN, director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing in Philadelphia, and colleagues reported April 2010 in the journal Health Services Research that California hospital med/surg nurses cared for one fewer patient per shift, on average, than nurses in the other states studied. The lower rates were associated with lower mortality, and nurse outcomes were predictive of better nurse retention in California than in other states studied.

“It validates our experience in reducing harm and death,” said DeAnn McEwen, RN, MSN, president of the California Nurses Association/National Nurses Organizing Committee and vice president of National Nurses United in Oakland, Calif., which is supporting a national staffing ratios bill (H2187 and S992) pending in Congress.

Proposed staffing regulations

Bill A00921 and S4553 propose the following staffing ratios:

• OR — 1 nurse to 1 patient

• Trauma emergency — 1 nurse to 1 patient

• ICU — 1 nurse to 1 patient

• Maternal/child — 1 nurse to 1 patient (during second and third stages of labor)

• Maternal/child — 1 nurse to 2 patients (during first stage of labor)

• Postanesthesia — 1 nurse to 2 patients

• Antepartum — 1 nurse to 3 patients

• ED — 1 nurse to 3 patients

• Pediatrics — 1 nurse to 3 patients

• Telemetry — 1 nurse to 3 patients

• Newborn/intermediate care nursery — 1 nurse to 3 patients

• Med/surg — 1 nurse to 4 patients

• Acute care psychiatric — 1 nurse to 4 patients

• Rehabilitation — 1 nurse to 5 patients

• Well-baby nursery — 1 nurse to 6 patients

Note: The minimum requirements shall be adjusted to reflect the need for additional direct-care nurses in accordance with an approved acuity system.

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posted in: Career, news, Employer News, New York
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UB Nursing Gets Green Light for Online RN-BS Program

BUFFALO, N.Y.—The University at Buffalo School of Nursing has received approval by the State Education Department and the State University of New York to reinstate its 12-month online RN-BS program.

The program is designed specifically for nurses who have completed a community college (associate’s degree) or hospital-based nursing program (diploma) and have passed the New York State licensure examination (NCLEX-RN) for registered nurses.

According to Susan Grinslade, PhD, RN, clinical professor and chair of UB’s undergraduate nursing department, the UB RN-BS will supplement and build upon the core nursing knowledge all RNs achieve prior to licensure and was reestablished in part because of inquiries from community partners Kaleida Health, Roswell Park and Catholic Health.

“The health care environment is more complex and ever-changing,” said Grinslade. “The newly designed RN-BS program is innovative, accessible for the working professional and designed to develop the nurse as a bedside leader to transform the delivery of patient-centered, safe and quality nursing care.”

The online program will help the nursing workforce in Western New York and possibly across the state move toward the Institute of Medicine’s recommendations to have 80 percent of nurses prepared at the baccalaureate level by 2020. The program also will complement New York State’s “RN to BSN-in-Ten” proposal, which recommends that community college and hospital-based graduates get a baccalaureate in nursing within 10 years.

“These recommendations are related to current research indicating that even a 10 percent increase in a BS-prepared, RN-workforce directly decreases the morbidity and mortality of current patients,” said Grinslade.

Grinslade also adds that the program is not just about meeting state and institutional recommendations. There are RNs who want the BS in nursing but don’t have access to a university-based school of nursing, either because of time or distance.

“Our online program enables nurses in rural areas to complete their degrees from home without distant travel. Our virtual classes also allow the nurse with family obligations and/or scheduling issues to access educational materials at his or her convenience around a family or work schedule,” she says.

The key attributes of the program are that it is student-centered and in a user-friendly, distance-learning/asynchronous format; that it is offered in a cohort format to ensure cost-effectiveness; and that it builds on previous education and experience without redundancy while mirroring the current traditional BSN program curriculum.

Grinslade says that by admitting students in cohorts they will be able to get to know and work with others within their cohort. She adds that it will also allow students from a specific health system to work with one another on class projects--their familiarity with their respective organizational cultures and nursing practices would give them shared knowledge on which to build.

The School of Nursing plans to admit its first RN-BS cohort in May of 2012. The application will be available on their website after March 1.

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posted in: Employer News, New York
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Where the jobs are: Health care solid, hospitality strong, nanotech horizon

Julie Wells, 43, of Mohawk, was looking for a career where she would be able to find a job, have benefits and enough income to support her family.

Want job security in the Mohawk Valley?

Become a nurse.

Julie Wells, 43, of Mohawk, was looking for a career where she would be able to find a job, have benefits and enough income to support her family.

She decided to go into health care, a field she has worked in for 23 years. Wells is a nurse manager of maternal child services at Faxton St. Luke’s Healthcare.

“I knew in nursing I would always be able to find a job,” Wells said. “I think there are still opportunities in health care. In some fields it’s very difficult, if this is where you want to live, for jobs.”

Wells is right on target.

In the Utica-Rome area, other than government jobs, health care is at the top of the list. Manufacturing, and hospitality and entertainment, also employ large numbers of workers, said Dave Mathis, director for Oneida County Workforce Development.

These major industries don’t seem to be changing anytime soon.

Businesses in health care industries, for example, employed 22,205 workers in the Utica-Rome area in 2011, a number that increased 113 from 2010, according to data from Mark Barbano, state Labor Department regional analyst.

And the prediction is health care will continue to grow as the population ages.

Jobs have been a major issue across the nation, with the unemployment rate standing at 8.5 percent. In the Mohawk Valley, unemployment rates and industries have not seen drastic changes.

“This area has been kind of interesting because we never get to the big highs in terms of jobs, or big lows,” Mathis said. “We get along steadily.”

The annual average unemployment rate in the Utica-Rome area was 7.9 percent in 2010 and remained the same in 2011, compared to 8.6 percent statewide in 2010 and 8 percent in 2011, according to state Department of Labor data.

Total jobs in all area industries decreased 1.4 percent from 2010 to 2011 during the January through June time period, according to the data. It was down mainly due to a decrease in federal jobs because many temporary workers were hired for the census, Barbano said.

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posted in: National, news, Employer News, New York
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Nurses will need four-year degree under new bill

Under a new piece of legislation in New York’s Assembly, all new nurses in New York would need to earn a four-year Bachelor of Science of Nursing (BSN) degree - within 10 years of passage of the bill.

Under the initiative, dubbed “BSN in 10,” a two-year associate’s degree leading to Registered Nurse (RN) licensure would be sufficient for up to a decade.

Despite an ongoing nursing shortage, the measure has mostly garnered support from the medical community. The text of the measure was penned by the New York Organization of Nurse Executives (NYONE), and the New York Nurses Association has endorsed and will lobby for the bill’s passage in the upcoming legislative session.

While the “BSN in 10” movement is a few years old nationally, only recently did most of the nursing community come on board, says Judith Lewis, dean of the nursing program at D’Youville College in Buffalo.

Some two-year associates degree programs feared their curriculum could be rendered irrelevant if new requirements pushed students onto BSN tracks, according to Lewis.

“It will be like a pipeline between the associate degree programs into the baccalaureate programs. So I think all programs will flourish,” says Lewis.

“People are sicker today”

Only one-third current nurses attain a BSN degree or higher, according to University at Buffalo’s nursing dean Susan Grinsalde. Many nurses elect to forgo returning to school because salaries don’t tend to be much higher for those in the profession with four-year degrees.

Without this financial incentive, New York State needs to step in and require this extra education, says Grinslade.

“Patients are sicker today. They’re much more complex, they’re much more technical. It requires a different type of thinking, critical thinking and clinical reasoning to provide the best and safest in quality care,” Grinslade says.

Modern medical care necessitates nurses who can keep up with advances, says Grinslade, who’s quick to point out there’s nothing inherently flawed about with a two-year degree. After all, every nurse, regardless of education level, take the same exam for licensure.

“Better patient outcomes”

The decade-long timeline envisioned for nurses to achieve a BSN will allow those in the profession ample opportunity to return to the classroom with ease, Grinslade says.

“For example ... a single mom who doesn’t have a lot of money and doesn’t have a lot of resources, may be able to spread her education out a little bit more,” she says.

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posted in: National, news, Employer News, New York
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New York, New Jersey See High Demand for CNSs

Given the Institute of Medicine’s “Future of Nursing” report spelling out the essential role of nurse leaders in advancing evidence-based healthcare, clinical nurse specialists increasingly are in high demand, particularly in the critical care setting.

CNSs are key to developing the culture of quality mandated by healthcare reform that will help hospitals meet heightened requirements for reducing infection rates and improving outcomes, nurse leaders say.

The CNS role attracts nurses who love research and like to teach outside an academic environment. Their expertise is extremely specialized, they educate clinical staff, patients and families, and they help build staff satisfaction in their roles as mentors.

In New Jersey, where master’s degree nursing programs are heavily focused on nurse practitioners, CNSs are sometimes hard to find when openings arise.

Master’s programs for CNSs also were disappearing in New York, says Kimberly Glassman, RN, Phd, NEA-BC, senior vice president of patient care services and CNO at NYU Langone Medical Center in Manhattan. But now, she says, universities are responding to renewed demand for these positions, and within the past few years have started to add the CNS master’s programs back in.

posted in: National, New Jersey, Employer News, New York
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